Seal meat at Toronto eatery pits Indigenous cuisine against animal welfare activists

0

A tasting plate of seal tartar, seal pepperoni and smoked seal meat, left, and seal tatki at the Au 5ieme Peche restaurant in Montreal, Wednesday, June 3, 2009. Demand for seal dishes has risen since the governor-general tasted raw seal meat last year. (Ryan Remiorz / THE CANADIAN PRESS)

A tasting plate of seal tartar, seal pepperoni and smoked seal meat, left, and seal tatki at the Au 5ieme Peche restaurant in Montreal, Wednesday, June 3, 2009.

A Toronto Indigenous restaurant is serving up seal meat with a side of controversy.

A boisterous online debate has erupted over the seal tartare on the menu at Ku-kum Kitchen, pitting animal rights activists against those who say calls to ban the dish amount to “anti-Indigenous” behaviour.

More than 4,400 people, featuring signators who claimed to be from countries including France, Slovenia, Italy, Brazil, and Greece, have added their names to an online petition calling for the eatery to remove seal meat from its menu. A counter-petition has garnered more than 3,900 supporters.

“The restaurant claims they are the only restaurant in Toronto that sells seal meat and we do not want this to become a new trend,” reads the text accompanying the anti-seal meat petition. “The seal slaughters are very violent, horrific, traumatizing and unnecessary. They are bludgeoned in the forehead with a tool called a hakapik or shot with a high-powered rifle, then cut under their flippers to bleed out.”

The petition goes on to claim the seal meat served at Ku-kum Kitchen comes from a commercial supplier called SeaDNA, and not traditional Indigenous hunting.

The counter-petition argues “anti-sealing campaigns have had detrimental economic impacts for the Inuit,” and encourages its supporters to “try the seal!”

The bulk of those in favour of Ku-kum Kitchen’s decision to serve seal meat identity themselves as Ontarians, as well as residents of neighbouring Canadian provinces.

Share.

Leave A Reply